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Skin Treatments

The real dangers of sun damage and why you need to take it seriously

‘Sun damage’ is a catchall phrase that refers to any harm done to your skin by the sun and for many reasons prevention is better than cure.

Daily protection is critical for avoiding sun damage from both UVA and UVB rays. This is because much of the sun damage that accumulates in our skin is the result of daily incidental sun exposure.

Various studies have shown that regardless of the weather or daily activities, the skin of the people who used sunscreen everyday aged significantly better.

Start taking care of your skin now

Don’t wait until you see signs of sun damage to start taking care of your skin. Daily SPF is essential, wear sunscreen on any skin exposed to direct sunlight, and not just when you go to the beach.

Wear hats and sunglasses to protect your eyes and face and seek shade as soon as you feel the sun is too harsh.

Try avoiding direct sunlight at peak hours which varies depending on where you live, but usually occurs in the afternoon.

Wear light, breathable, long-sleeved shirts and pants when possible, especially if you’re particularly susceptible to sunburns. These may seem obvious, but current data suggest they are not always observed, to the detriment of our skin.

DNA damage to your skin

You can treat the aesthetic effects of sun damage. But you unfortunately can’t reduce or reverse DNA damage caused by the sun. Once DNA mutation has occurred due to UV irradiation, there is no way to undo that.

What sun damage actually looks like

Sun damaged skin can show up as actinic keratosis, wrinkles, spots, spider veins, a blotchy or ruddy complexion, and can even progress to skin cancer. It often looks different across skin tones.

In lighter skin types, thinning of the skin, fine lines and discolorations will be apparent. In darker skin types, discolorations may be the most prominent feature of sun damage.

UVA rays are generally linked to the aging of skin cells and tend to be the cause of wrinkles, sunspots and other signs of sun damage.

UVB rays, on the other hand, are the principal cause of sunburns, directly damage DNA in skin cells and are linked to most skin cancers.

How some damage can be reversed

While the negatives seem overwhelming, it is possible to reverse (sun damage) to some extent. This can be done by utilizing lasers, chemical peels and certain topical medications to destroy dark spots and vessels. You can encourage collagen deposition and remove the damaged layers of skin if you have discoloration, wrinkles, or fine lines.

At Gentle Revive we understand you dermatological and personal requirements better than anybody else. If you’ve been burned one too many times and regret the outcome, let us discuss what options you might have.

Sources:

  1. https://www.skincancer.org/
  2. https://www.webmd.com/
  3. https://www.stanfordchildrens.org/
  4. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/
Categories
Skin Treatments

Why do I get sunburn, but not a tan?

Have you ever wondered why you only need five minutes in direct sunlight to turn a bright shade of pink, while your friend Anna can spend hours outside and end up at worst with a revitalizing glow?

Note, however, that both are signs of cellular damage to the skin.

However, we can answer this by looking at what sunburn is.

Sunburn is an inflammatory reaction to ultraviolet (UV) radiation damage to the skin’s outermost layers. At the heart of it all is melanin, a pigment that gives your skin its color and defends it against the sun’s rays.

How does melanin work?

Melanin works by darkening your unprotected sun-exposed skin. The amount of melanin you produce is determined by genetics, which is why some people get sunburned while others tan. Both are signs of cellular damage to the skin, and for people with less melanin, prolonged unprotected sun exposure can cause skin cells to become red, swollen and painful, also known as sunburn. Sunburns can range from mild to blistering.

Some people are more prone to sunburn

Skin type determines your susceptibility; people with fair skin run the greatest risk. But anyone can get burned. Even without a burn, sun exposure raises skin cancer risk. Even if you are tan or your skin type is dark and your skin does not redden, the sun can cause cellular damage that can lead to cancer.

How sunburn damages your skin

Sunburn hurts you in more ways than one. The danger goes far beyond any short-term pain, redness and discomfort, because after the sunburn fades, lasting damage remains. Sunburn accelerates skin aging and is a leading cause in the majority of cases of basal cell carcinomasquamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer.

As you get older and have accumulated a lot of time in the sun, those freckles are only some of the damage you are able to see. Sun damaged skin can show up as actinic keratosis, wrinkles, spots, spider veins, a blotchy or ruddy complexion, and can even progress to skin cancer.

The UV index factor

The UV index is a factor: The sun varies in intensity by season, time of day and geographic location. A high UV index means that unprotected skin will burn faster or more severely. Be careful, especially when the sun is strongest. But even when the index is low, the risk remains.

Repeat sunburns put you at a substantial risk for skin cancer and premature skin aging, so you need to protect yourself every day of the year. Everybody must ‘learn from their burn’, your skin will heal, but the real damage has been done.

At Gentle Revive we understand you dermatological and personal requirements better than anybody else, if you’ve been burned one too many time and regret the outcome, let us discuss what options you might have, and which solution is best for you.

Sources:

  1. https://www.healthline.com/
  2. https://www.popsci.com/
  3. https://www.mayoclinic.org/
  4. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/

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